Local Area

Glasgow

glasgow

Glasgow is the most Scottish of cities, with a unique blend of friendliness, urban chaos, black humour and energy. It boasts excellent art galleries and museums, as well as numerous good-value restaurants, countless pubs and bars and a rollicking arts scene.

Glasgow is one of Britain’s largest, liveliest and most interesting cities, with a legacy of appealing Victorian architecture and several distinguished suburbs of terraced squares and crescents.

The city centre is built on a grid system on the north side of the River Clyde. The two train stations (Central and Queen St), the Buchanan Bus Station and the TIC are all within a couple of blocks of George Square, the main city square. Running along a ridge in the northern part of the city, Sauchiehall St (first syllable pronounced ‘suck’) has a pedestrian mall with numerous High Street shops at its eastern end, and pubs and restaurants at its western end. Argyle St, running parallel to the river, and pedestrianised Buchanan St, at right angles to Argyle St, are important shopping streets. Merchant City is the commercial district, east of George Square.

glasgow2Glasgow boasts an excellent public transport system, especially the local rail network. The Roundabout Glasgow ticket covers all underground and train transport in the city for a day. If you’re going further afield, get the FirstTourist ticket. Local bus services around the city are frequent. It helps to have exact change when you board. First Glasgow publishes the complicated but useful Glasgow Mapmate, which shows all local First bus routes.

Taxis are plentiful in Glasgow (and the drivers can be a mine of information), plus there’s an extensive suburban network of trains in and around Glasgow; tickets should be bought before travel if the station is staffed, or from the conductor if it isn’t.

There’s also an underground line that serves 15 stations in the centre, west and south of the city. The rail network connects with the Underground at Buchanan St station.